HCCT:Rmx – Human Code Computer Tongue: Remix

Human Code Computer Tongue (HCCT) took a second run around the conversation of Artificial Intelligence and Creativity.

In February 2017, a collective of poets and tech heads came together for HCCT  to explore what the future of AI in creative spaces means for humanity.
An open call-out to linguistic code developers and poetic creative writers who were serious about technology invited them to explore the futuristic potential technology  will continue to have on the process of creative writing and creating art. It was a risk using poetry to explore the bigger themes of AI’s impact on our lives and the world,  as it is such a niche case study. It could trap the language in impersonality, devoid of emotional nuance,  and stuck in the left brain workings of linguistics. This would omit the crucial conversation of AI’s impact on our imagination, the muscle of human creative innovation.

On the contrary, the discussion we passionate and layered. Technology reveals our evolution. It exposes the frontiers of consciousness we can command and conquer. Big talk.  AI’s grip on our imaginations and our realities will always involve big talk. It ignites excitement, yet emboldens dissent as mobile devices enhance our commercial lifestyles of convenience, information sharing, daring social interaction, nefarious activity and testing the temperature of the political climate. Continue reading “HCCT:Rmx – Human Code Computer Tongue: Remix”

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HCCT:Remix at The Free Word Centre – 5th December ’17 @ 7pm

The Dartmouth College Turing test competition challenged participants to design a computer program that could write poems indistinguishable from human-written sonnets. Artwork: Annelise Capossela

A Verse in Dialog & Apples and Snakes production in collaboration with University College London:
Human Code Computer Tongue: Remix – the relationship between human and artificial creativity and consciousness

In an evening of spoken word poetry and lively debate, we will revisit and expand upon themes raised by participants of the HCCT:Rmx masterclass in October. After passionate discussions about the first robot to be granted Saudi Arabian citizenship, (almost) award-winning AI novelists, chat-bots banned for bigotry on social media, and child sexbot slaves being apprehended by customs at British airports, participants experienced what it is to be  part of a neural network machine to create spoken word poetry.

Is artificial creativity fundamentally different from that of humans? Can we even tell the difference? Is there an intended meaning in the writings of machines? The audience can be the judge in a poetry slam between humans and machines.

When: Tuesday 5 December, 7-8.45pm
Where: Lecture Theatre, Free Word Centre, 60 Farringdon Road, London, EC1R 3GA
Bookings: FREE, but booking is essential. Book your place here!

For more details and tickets: http://applesandsnakes.org/2017/11/07/human-code-computer-tongue-remix/

Human Code Computer Tongue

human-android

University College London, Apples and Snakes poetry organisation and poets, Zena Edwards from Verse in Dialog in collaboration present Human Code Computer Tongue.

When: Monday 20 February 2017, 10am-4pm

Where: UCL, 5th Floor Reception, One Euston Square, 40 Melton St, London NW1 2FD (Please report to the ground floor reception)

Tickets: FREE – but booking essential!

Booking: To book your place, please complete a short expression of interest form and email it to daniela@applesandsnakes.org with the masterclass title as the subject.
Apples and Snakes Website

Our imaginations have never been so challenged in the 21st Century. Have we ever been as cornered  by thoughts of our collective mortality outside the age of enlightenment in relation to the global economic and political climate as we have been over the last 16 years. Science has promised us the GM cures for disease, our continued life on this and other planets as well as bionic bodies, cryogenics freezing and the growing of body parts in petri dishes and on the backs of mice.
But in the race to reach the forever disappearing finish line of immortality,  and despite the intricate and omnipotence of the interweb of handsfree communication and connection, we have never been so connected to each other and yet so disconnected. Our Continue reading “Human Code Computer Tongue”

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